APRIL 2005 NEWS RELEASES 

WEEK OF APRIL 28, 2005

WEEK OF APRIL 21, 2005

WEEK OF APRIL 14, 2005

WEEK OF APRIL 7, 2005

 Antlerless deer season dates set by the Wildlife Conservation Commission

         Deer hunters in west-central Oklahoma will have more opportunity to harvest an antlerless deer next year.

         At their recent meeting, the Oklahoma Wildlife Conservation Commission approved a measure that would allow antlerless deer harvest for the full 16 days of the regular deer gun season in zone seven, which includes Roger Mills County and portions of Ellis, Beckham, Washita, Custer, Blaine and Dewey counties.

         “After visiting with landowners, biologists and state game wardens, we feel like the deer herd in the area is growing and it would be appropriate to increase the antlerless deer hunting opportunities during the 2005-06 season,” said Alan Peoples, wildlife chief for the Oklahoma Department of Wildlife Conservation.

         Besides calendar adjustments, no other changes were made to antlerless deer hunting seasons across the state.

         The Commission also approved the special antlerless deer seasons to be held the weekends before and after Christmas.

         In other business, the Commission accepted two donations from the Oklahoma State Game Warden Association. First, the Association donated a GP360 trap thrower to promote shotgun training in the state.

         The donation will support the Oklahoma Department of Wildlife Conservation's Shotgun Training and Education Program (STEP). The program, designed for all skill levels, offers seminars for shooters to learn more about shotgun shooting. Approximately 7,500 people attended more than 105 STEP events held last year. The STEP seminars are offered free of charge for groups of 25 or more people.

         Second, the Commission accepted a $3,000 donation from the Oklahoma State Game Warden Association to be used at the seventh annual Wildlife Youth Camp.

         “The Camp is an excellent opportunity to teach Oklahoma youth about the outdoors and motivate them in a positive direction,” said Gary Roller, with the Oklahoma State Game Warden Association.

         Scheduled June 26 through July 1 at Camp McFadden near Ponca City, the camp is open to Oklahoma youths ages 14 to 16. Participants will attend courses in firearms handling, wildlife law enforcement, wildlife and fisheries biology, water safety, self-defense, rifle and shotgun training, waterfowl hunting and archery. The deadline for applying is April 29, 2005 and applications are available at www.wildlifedepartment.com.

         Also at their April meeting, commissioners voted to designate the natural low-water crossing on the Blue River Public Fishing and Hunting Area as “Hughes Crossing.”

         The Wildlife Conservation Commission is the eight-member governing board of the Oklahoma Department of Wildlife Conservation. The Wildlife Commission establishes state hunting and fishing regulations, sets policy for the Wildlife Department, and indirectly oversees all state fish and wildlife conservation activities. Commission members are appointed by the Governor and confirmed by the Senate.

         The next scheduled Commission meeting is May 2 at the Oklahoma Department of Wildlife Conservation headquarters (auditorium), at the southwest corner of 18th and North Lincoln, Oklahoma City at 9:00 a.m.

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Riggs appointed to Wildlife Commission

         M. David Riggs, Sand Springs, was recently appointed by Gov. Brad Henry to serve on the Oklahoma Wildlife Conservation Commission. Riggs was appointed to complete the remainder of former Commissioner Jack Zink’s term, set to expire in June, and he was also nominated to serve as the District 1 Commissioner for the term to expire in 2013.

          A lifelong resident of Sand Springs, Riggs is a partner in one of the state’s largest law firms - Riggs, Abney, Neal, Turpen, Orbison & Lewis. Riggs also served as a member of the Oklahoma House of Representatives from 1971 to 1987 and served in the Oklahoma Senate from 1987 to 1988.

         Riggs will serve as the Wildlife Commission's District 1 representative. The district includes Ottawa, Delaware, Craig, Mayes, Nowata, Rogers, Washington, Tulsa, Pawnee, and Osage counties.  The Oklahoma Wildlife Conservation Commission is the eight-member board which governs all operations and financial transactions of the Oklahoma Department of Wildlife Conservation, the state agency responsible for fish and wildlife management in the state. The Wildlife Commission establishes state hunting and fishing regulations, sets policy for the Department, and indirectly oversees all state fish and wildlife conservation activities. Commission members are appointed by the Governor and confirmed by the Senate. 

          “I feel that conserving nature is one of the most important things we can do," Riggs said. "Many of our family events are centered around the outdoors whether it be hiking, camping, backpacking or canoeing. My family and I certainly love the outdoors. We should all work hard to protect it for the next generation."

         Riggs, along with his wife of 45 years, Arleen, have five children and seven grandchildren.

          Riggs is active in a number of local conservation organizations including serving of the board of trustees of The Nature Conservancy and serving as the chairman of the board of directors for the Sutton Avian Research Center.

         He graduated from Phillips University in Enid in 1959, received a Masters of Arts form the University of Oklahoma in 1962 and graduated first in his class at the University of Tulsa College of Law in 1968.

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 Cutline: M. David Riggs, Sand Springs, was recently appointed by Gov. Brad Henry to serve on the Oklahoma Wildlife Conservation Commission. Riggs was appointed to complete the remainder of former Commissioner Jack Zink’s term, set to expire in June, and he was also nominated to serve as the District 1 Commissioner for the term to expire in 2013.

 

 

More than 100 years later, “Hughes Crossing” is still a popular recreation destination

            In 1895 crossing the many creeks and rivers in Oklahoma was a bit more complicated than just driving across a steel and concrete bridge.

Early pioneers sought out wide areas in the creeks that offered shallow water and firm footing for horses and wagons. A low-water crossing that met all those criteria is still in use today at the Blue River Public Fishing and Hunting Area. The Oklahoma Wildlife Conservation Commission recently designated the historic route, “Hughes Crossing.”

            It all started in 1895 when Mamie Cravatt married Austin Britt Hughes. A year later the U.S. Congress directed the Dawes Commission to begin making out the rolls of Indian citizens in preparation for the land allotment process. The Hughes family received a total of eight allotments and Mr. Hughes selected his allotments along the Blue River in Johnston County.

            Local citizens, traveling from Milburn to Connerville, soon began to call the natural river crossing on the property “Hughes Crossing.” The enterprising Austin Britt Hughes, who, with his wife, had 10 children, also recognized the value of the property.

            He established a fishing and hunting camp on the east bank of the Blue River, which was also called “Hughes Crossing.” Mr. Hughes charged 50 cents a day or $1.00 a car carrying four passengers for four days of recreation and relaxation.

            The Hughes family sold the original allotments to local landowners in 1950. However, in 1967 the Oklahoma Department of Wildlife Conservation purchased the property and established the Blue River Public Fishing and Hunting Area.

         Today, the Blue River in southern Oklahoma is widely known as one of the most scenic areas in the state. The tumbling waterfalls, rolling hills and excellent facilities of the Blue River Public Fishing and Hunting Area attract visitors from miles around.

         Covering more than 3,000 acres, the area attracts a wide range of outdoor enthusiasts, from fishermen and hunters in the fall and winter to campers and picnickers in the spring and summer. Winding through the public fishing and hunting area is six miles of the Blue River. Located four miles east of Tishomingo, in Johnston County, the river supports a wintertime trout season from Nov. 1 to March 31 annually. The river also supports good fishing for channel catfish and sunfish species year-round.

Non-hunting and non-angling visitors will need a Blue River Conservation Passport for entering or using the Blue River Public Fishing and Hunting Area. Residents and non-residents who hold valid annual or lifetime Oklahoma hunting or fishing licenses are exempt from purchasing the $21 passport. Exemptions are also allowed for those under 18 years of age, students on educational tours and those participating in organized events sanctioned in advance by the Oklahoma Department of Wildlife Conservation. This special use permit is used to maintain camping locations, maintain roads and manage wildlife habitat.

 

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 Brown trout record shattered

It has been said that records are made to be broken, but on April 10, 2005, Oklahoma's state record for brown trout of  9 pounds, 12 3/4 ounces, was not only broken, it was shattered.

Jason Archie of Broken Bow, Oklahoma caught a brown trout that not only surpassed the old record, it nearly doubled it with a catch of 17-pound, 4.64-ounce.

It all began Sunday evening around 5:00 p.m. just before a storm front hit the area.

"I've been fishing the Mountain Fork River ever since I was little bitty and when spring comes I fish everyday. I really didn't expect to catch a record brown, I was aiming for a record walleye," said Archie. "When I first hooked the fish, I thought I had a really big walleye, and then as I was reeling it in towards me it rolled on its side in front of me. When I saw all that gold coloring, I thought, 'Whoa, now that's a big fish!' It then took off

down river and I was stripping line out as fast as I could, thinking how thankful I was that I wasn't using my ultra-light because I would have ran out of line. Before it turned around, it had made about an 80 yard run."

The self proclaimed "River Rat" Archie went on to say that the battle lasted 35 minutes before he finally landed the monster just below the reregulation dam on the lower Mountain Fork River.

“When I finally got the fish up to me, and could see for sure it was a trout and not a walleye, I just knew it was a state record. It was a little hectic getting it on a stringer and trying to get a rough weight on my digital scale by myself,” said Archie. “I then called our game warden and had him meet me at the Frontier General Store in Hochatown to officially weigh it on certified scales.”

"I always check the Farmers Almanac and the moon phases (as he points to his moon phase watch on his wrist) so I know when it’s a good time to fish," said Archie.

Archie was fishing with an Ambassadeur 5600 DS baitcasting reel and a Berkley Bionix rod with 10 lb. test line. The lure of choice was a shad-colored Lucky Craft Pointer 78 Tennessee.

"A record trout of this size is truly a feather in the cap of the Wildlife Department's trout program," said Paul Balkenbush, southeast region fisheries supervisor for the Oklahoma Department of Wildlife Conservation. "Brown trout were provided to the Wildlife Department by the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service in the early 1990's to help offset the impacts of the altered flow of the natural river caused by the Broken Bow Lake dam,'' Balkenbush said. “A fish this size produced by this river is likely to be between eight and twelve years old.”

Archie decided to release his record fish back into the Mountain Fork River since Womack's Taxidermy in Hochatown has offered to donate a replica mount to him.

"By releasing this fish I can hopefully pass on the excitement I've experienced to another angler someday, because I believe this fish will just get bigger," stated Archie.

Balkenbush commended Archie for his valiant efforts to keep the fish not only alive, but in excellent condition overnight.

"I stayed up all night long and every two hours I would change the water in my homemade livewell to make sure this baby would stay alive," Archie said.

The trout fishery on the Mountain Fork River, which runs through the Beavers Bend State Park, is open year round, with tremendous opportunity for creating memories that will last a lifetime. So take a friend, you'll need someone to take a picture of you and that next record fish.

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Controlled Hunts deadline drawing near

         Hopeful hunters have just a few more weeks to apply for the 2005-2006 Controlled Hunts. Applicants have until May 6, 2005, to turn in their applications. Hunters can now submit their applications for the hunts over the Internet by logging onto www.wildlifedepartment.com

         “When it comes right down to it, applying online is the way to go. It’s fast, it’s easy and the program will help ensure that you don’t make any mistakes on your application,” said Melinda Sturgess-Streich, chief of administration for the Oklahoma Department of Wildlife Conservation.

         Not only can hunters save a stamp by applying online, they can also confirm that their application has been received as soon as they apply.

         Controlled Hunts booklets are also available at hunting and fishing license dealers located throughout the state, as well as is in PDF format that can be printed off the Department’s Web site (wildlifedepartment.com).

         Administered by the Oklahoma Department of Wildlife Conservation, the Controlled Hunts Program offers a wide variety of highly desirable hunts through a random drawing. Some hunts are held to provide high-quality hunting experiences on high-profile areas where it is necessary to regulate hunting pressure. Others are held to achieve management goals for certain species, and others are held to provide hunting experiences in areas where access is otherwise limited.

         A $5 fee is required of all applicants including lifetime hunting or lifetime combination license holders. This fee is good for ALL 2005-2006 controlled hunt applications submitted by each sportsman. Since the fee is per person and not per application, hunters should decide to apply for all their hunt categories either by mail or online, but not both. Hunters who choose to mail in their applications must complete the processing fee payment form on page 24 of the controlled hunts booklet. Payment can be made by the following methods: cashier's check, money order, cash or credit card.

         For complete application instructions, including tips on enhancing your chances of being selected, log on to www.wildlifedepartment.com or consult the “Oklahoma Controlled Hunts 2005-2006” booklet.

 

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Wildlife Youth Camp offered near Ponca City

         Kids who love the outdoors have until April 29 to turn in their application to attend the Oklahoma Department of Wildlife Conservation's Wildlife Youth Camp. Youth interested in wildlife, fisheries and law enforcement can have fun and learn a thing or two at the weeklong camp, which is conducted each year by wildlife professionals including game wardens and biologists.

          “We have great time with the kids. It’s a good opportunity to learn what wildlife professionals do on a day to day to basis. And best of all - it’s all free,” said Jon Cunningham, Oklahoma game warden stationed in Payne County.

         Scheduled June 26-July 1 at Camp McFadden near Ponca City, the camp is open to Oklahoma youths ages 14 to 16. Applicants must turn 14 prior to June 26, 2005. Participants will attend courses in firearms handling, wildlife law enforcement, wildlife and fisheries biology, water safety, self-defense, rifle and shotgun training, waterfowl hunting and archery.

         The seventh annual youth wildlife camp is free of charge but will be limited to 35 participants. Applicants should be interested in fish and wildlife management or law enforcement and must submit a 75-word essay explaining why they want to attend the camp, why they believe they should be selected and what they expect to learn while attending. They must also submit a letter of recommendation from a person of their choice other than a family member.

         The application deadline is April 29. To obtain applications, contact the Wildlife Department's Law Enforcement Division at P.O. Box 53465, Oklahoma City, OK 73152, or by calling (405) 521-3719. Applications may also be available from local wardens or from the Wildlife Department's Web site www.wildlifedepartment.com. Simply print off the application, fill it out and mail it in with the essay and letter of recommendation.

 

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Oklahoma Enrolls First Playa into CP23a Program

         Bill Smithton, a Harper County farmer, knew something had to give. For 12 years he farmed, or attempted to farm, the same low-lying field.

         “I could only count on a crop every four or five years,” Smithton said.

         The other years he would plant a crop only to lose it when the area, which is actually a playa lake, would flood after a heavy rain.

         But this coming harvest season Smithton won’t have to worry or watch the rain gauge. He can relax and be thankful he signed the property up in a unique Conservation Reserve Program initiative called CP23a.

         Smithton, along with his sister Betty Dhotre, were the first in Oklahoma to sign up for the program. The two heard about CP23a through the outreach efforts of the Oklahoma Wildlife and Prairie Heritage Alliance, a grassroots partnership focused on educating landowners on conservation issues and program opportunities in western Oklahoma.

         The initiative provides cost share, annual rental payments and other financial incentives to landowners to restore and protect wetlands. But playas certainly are not the only habitats eligible for the program, most other wetlands located outside the 100-year floodplain also qualify for the CP23a program. Signup is on a continuous basis and interested landowners should contact their local Farm Service Agency (FSA) office to enroll.

         “First of all, the program is good for the wildlife. Second it is good for me as a farmer, because I don’t have to risk my inputs on the land on an annual basis. And it is also good for my sister, who owns the land, because she receives an economic incentive for enrolling the property,” Smithton said.

         Wetlands must have been farmed four out of the past six years and buffers of up to four times the wetland acreage are also eligible for enrollment. Unlike other CRP wetlands programs, this new initiative has no maximum wetland size, which will allow larger playas to be enrolled.

          Oklahoma now joins the ranks of Kansas and Texas as states that have successfully enrolled playa lakes in the CP23a program. Total enrollment is currently about 600 acres; yet that is a small fraction of the 56,600 acres that are eligible to member states of the Playa Lakes Joint Venture.

         The Playa Lakes Joint Venture (PLJV) is a regional partnership dedicated to the conservation of playa lakes, other wetlands and associated landscapes for the benefit of birds, other wildlife and people. Partners include state wildlife agencies of Oklahoma, Colorado, Kansas, Nebraska, New Mexico, and Texas, as well as a wide variety of other conservation organizations. The PLJV was established in 1989 and since then, has raised more than $50 million to conserve more than 100,000 acres of wetlands and other wildlife habitat in the High Plains. For more information about the PLJV visit www.pljv.org 

          Playa lakes are shallow, seasonal wetlands that are scattered throughout the High Plains and are crucial to sustaining the region's wildlife and water. Millions of waterfowl, cranes, shorebirds and grassland bird species use playas throughout the year.

         “Playa lakes are the most critical habitat for migrating shorebirds and waterfowl in western Oklahoma. They provide both loafing areas and important forage sources during the bird’s annual migrations,” said John Hendrix, private lands biologist for the Oklahoma Department of Wildlife Conservation.

         Additionally, wetlands are the primary source of recharge for the Ogallala Aquifer which supplies the majority of the region's ground water used for drinking and irrigation. Because playa lakes are dry much of the year, many people do not recognize them as wetlands. But the wet-dry cycle of playas is a natural function of the wetlands. The seasonality of playas produces diverse vegetation which supports all types of birds - waterfowl, shorebirds and grassland species alike.

         For more information about CP23a and other private lands programs contact your local Farm Service Agency or call the Oklahoma Department of Wildlife Conservation at (405) 880-0994.

 

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 Bank on it – crappie moving to shallow water

         According to the weekly fishing report, compiled by Oklahoma Department of Wildlife Conservation personnel and other individuals, crappie fishing is picking up across the state.

          From Eufaula, to Canton, to Texoma lakes, crappie are moving into shallow water and anglers are not far behind. Crappie fishing is one of the most popular fishing opportunities available due to their willingness to bite and their fine flavor at the dinner table.

         Crappie is a great opportunity to introduce a youngster to fishing. No fancy gear is required. A small jig or minnow is often very effective and the nice thing is, you can be very successful fishing from shore.

         The best place to fish for crappie this time of year is around brush in shallow water. Crappie can be found moving into shallow water to spawn once the water temperature reaches the upper 50s to lower 60s. Crappie spawning generally takes place in water only 18 to 36 inches deep.

          For a complete list of regulations, anglers should pick up a copy of the “2005 Oklahoma Fishing Guide” before heading out on any fishing adventure and check out specific lake conditions and fishing action by logging on to the Department’s Web site at www.wildlifedepartment.com.

 

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Hummingbird survey available at wildlifedepartment.com

The Wildlife Diversity Program of the Oklahoma Department of Wildlife Conservation needs your help to track the hummingbirds in our state.

Citizens who place hummingbird feeders at their home are encouraged to participate in the annual hummingbird survey found at www.wildlifedepartment.com. Biologists us survey results to obtain information on the state's hummingbird population and to learn how long these fascinating migrants reside in Oklahoma each year.

Hummingbirds are unique in many respects. They are the only birds that can hover, fly backward and upside down as easily as they fly forward. Hummingbirds are neotropical migrants – birds that winter in South America and Mexico and migrate to North America to breed. 

         “The hummingbirds seen in Oklahoma fly 500 miles across the Gulf of Mexico during both spring and fall migrations,” said Jenny Thom, natural resources information specialist with the Oklahoma Department of Wildlife Conservation. “The bird's sparkling beauty, amazing antics at sugar-water feeders and tolerance of human activities certainly makes it one of Oklahoma’s favorite ‘Watchable Wildlife’ species.”

         A simple way to attract hummingbirds to your home is to set out a sugar-water feeder specifically designed for hummers. Here are a few tips to get you started.

    Use a formula of one part sugar to four parts boiled water. This solution best mimics natural flower nectar.  Never use honey or sugar substitutes.

    Place the feeders outside in April and leave them up until at least November 1. This provides nectar for both early spring and late fall migrating hummingbirds. Other birds such as orioles and chickadees may also be attracted to your hummingbird feeder.

    Place feeders in the shade. If more than one is used, place them far apart to avoid competition from the territorial hummingbirds.

    Feeders should be cleaned about once a week with hot water and vinegar, to inhibit the growth of a fungus that is dangerous to hummingbirds.

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Controlled Hunts deadline just days away

         Time is running short.  Applicants have until May 6, 2005, to turn in their applications for the 2005-06 Controlled Hunts.  Hunters can submit their applications for the hunts over the Internet by logging onto www.wildlifedepartment.com.

         “When it comes right down to it, applying online is the way to go. It’s fast, it’s easy and the program will help ensure that you don’t make any mistakes on your application,” said Melinda Sturgess-Streich, chief of administration for the Oklahoma Department of Wildlife Conservation.

         Not only can hunters save a stamp by applying online, they can also confirm that their application has been received as soon as they apply.

         Controlled Hunts booklets are also available at hunting and fishing license dealers located throughout the state, as well as is in PDF format that can be printed off the Department’s Web site (wildlifedepartment.com).

         Administered by the Oklahoma Department of Wildlife Conservation, the Controlled Hunts Program offers a wide variety of highly desirable hunts through a random drawing. Some hunts are held to provide high-quality hunting experiences on high-profile areas where it is necessary to regulate hunting pressure. Others are held to achieve management goals for certain species, and others are held to provide hunting experiences in areas where access is otherwise limited.

         A $5 fee is required of all applicants including lifetime hunting or lifetime combination license holders. This fee is good for ALL 2005-2006 controlled hunt applications submitted by each sportsman. Since the fee is per person and not per application, hunters should decide to apply for all their hunt categories either by mail or online, but not both. Hunters who choose to mail in their applications must complete the processing fee payment form on page 24 of the controlled hunts booklet. Payment can be made by the following methods: cashier's check, money order, cash or credit card.

         For complete application instructions, including tips on enhancing your chances of being selected, log on to www.wildlifedepartment.com or consult the “Oklahoma Controlled Hunts 2005-2006” booklet.

 

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Squirrel season opens May 15

         One of the great things about the outdoors is that there is always another great hunting season or event right around the corner. Just as turkey season is winding to a close, it’s time to think about another hunting season – squirrel season. Running May 15 through Jan. 31, squirrel season is one of the longest continuous hunting seasons available in Oklahoma.

         While deer and turkey may get all the headlines, many experienced hunters started out stalking bushy tails in the woods. Early season action is often fast paced and the weather is comfortable. But don’t think that it is necessarily easy, woodland squirrels have sharp eyesight and hearing and can disappear in a treetop faster than you can say abracadabra. Squirrels are not only a popular game species, they provide tasty meals of stew and other dishes.

         Squirrel hunting is a perfect opportunity to introduce someone new to hunting. There is enough walking and action so rookies don't get bored, plus you don't even have to get up at the break of dawn to be successful.

         Both the gray and fox squirrel are abundant on many of the Department's wildlife management areas. A generous 10-squirrel limit offers a challenge to those going afield with a .22 caliber rifle. Other sportsmen prefer carrying a shotgun while going after squirrels. Another option that is increasing in popularity are pellet rifles, which through the years have become adequately powerful to deliver squirrels to the bag.

         Public hunting opportunities abound in Oklahoma for squirrel hunters. Just about any tract of mast-producing hardwoods can be a productive area for hunters and you would be hard-pressed to find a small crowd of squirrel hunters anywhere. Excellent squirrel hunting can be found on Keystone, Spavinaw Hills, Deep Fork, Canton and other wildlife management areas.

         To hunt squirrels in Oklahoma, you need a resident or non-resident hunting license unless exempt and a $5 Fishing and Hunting Legacy Permit, unless exempt. Resident hunters younger than age 16 can hunt squirrels without a license. For a complete list of squirrel hunting regulations consult the “2005 Oklahoma Hunting Guide” or log on to the Department's Web site at www.wildlifedepartment.com.

 

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Video tapes and “Skins and Skulls” trunks available for checkout

         The Oklahoma Department of Wildlife Conservation offers a wide range of educational resources available to teachers, civic organizations and those wanting to learn more about the Oklahoma outdoors.

         More than 60 educational and entertaining video tapes are available free of charge at www.wildlifedepartment.com. The videos range in length from just a few minutes to over an hour and cover a wide range of topics from backyard wildlife to gun safety to bass fishing. The videos are available to checkout at no charge to Oklahoma schools and conservation or civic organizations for public showing.

         The Wildlife Department also offers several “Skins and Skulls” trunks to help youngsters learn about the state’s diverse animals. In each trunk is an array of animal skulls, fur pelts, antlers and bones. The contents are sure to hold a kid’s interest as they learn about what these animals eat, where they live and why conserving all wildlife is so important. To borrow one of these unique trunks call (405) 521-3856.

         Classroom resource trunks are also available for checkout. Each trunk includes items such as video tapes, field guides, and visual aids that match a particular theme such as water, insects or endangered species. To borrow one of these trunks contact Lisa Anderson at (405) 990-1292 or send an e-mail to okprojectwild@fullnet.net. Anderson is the Project Wild coordinator for the Oklahoma Department of Wildlife Conservation.

         The Wildlife Department’s Web site includes over 30 digital brochures that offer a wide range of information for just about everybody. You can read them right off your computer screen or print them off and read them at your leisure.

         Whether you’re interested in learning more about the Wildlife Department, getting rid of aquatic vegetation in your pond or learning about black bears in Oklahoma, it can all be found with a few clicks of the mouse. In addition to these helpful publications the Department’s annual hunting and fishing regulations are also available on the site.

         To find this wealth of information simply log onto wildlifedepartment.com and click on Publications, Regulations and Outdoor Store. Many of the documents are offered in both a PDF and text only format.

 

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