FEBRUARY 2006 NEWS RELEASES 

 

WEEK OF FEBRUARY 23, 2006

WEEK OF FEBRUARY 16, 2006

WEEK OF FEBRUARY 9, 2006

WEEK OF FEBRUARY 2, 2006

 

Tickets available for Oklahoma Station of the Safari Club International's annual banquet

The Oklahoma Station of the Safari Club International will hold their annual banquet Saturday, March 4, at the National Cowboy and Western Heritage Museum in Oklahoma City. The event offers outdoor enthusiasts a great chance to take part in many important projects and programs supported by the Oklahoma Station of the Safari Club.

Most recently the Oklahoma Station of the Safari Club International was a sponsor of the first annual Oklahoma Wildlife Expo. Last year the organization also donated $3,000 to the Hunter's Against Hunger program, which facilitates the distribution of hunter-harvested venison to needy families.

The organization also donated $3,000 to be used towards the purchase of an airboat that will be used on waterfowl surveys and other wetland management tasks. Recently, the group provided a 24-foot gooseneck trailer to the Department. The trailer is now used in the Department's Shotgun Training Education Program, which introduces both youth and adults to shotgun shooting techniques and the proper handling of firearms. Additionally, the organization purchased eight elk for introduction into an existing herd in southeast Oklahoma.

The Oklahoma Station of the Safari Club International also sponsors the Department's annual youth essay contest. The contest gives youngsters the opportunity to share their feelings about the Oklahoma outdoors and gives them the opportunity to win great prizes including a guided pronghorn antelope hunt in New Mexico.

In addition to a great meal and fine fellowship one of the highlights of the annual event is the live auction. Bidders will have a chance buy guided hunts in Oklahoma, across the United States and around the world. There will also be a wide array of items on the auction block including art, firearms, camping equipment, vacations, jewelry and much more.
For more information or to purchase tickets call (405) 721-7229.

 

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NatureWorks to hold annual art show

Oklahomans will soon have an opportunity to view the works of some of the country's most talented wildlife artists at the NatureWorks Wildlife Art Show and Sale, March 4-5. The annual show, held in Tulsa, attracts some of the best wildlife sculptors and painters in the nation.

More than 20 Federal Duck Stamp paintings will be on display, including Sherrie Russell Meline's painting of Ross' geese which will be featured on the 2006 federal duck stamp. Bruce Miller, Mark Anderson, and Scott Storm, each past duck stamp winners, will be at the Wildlife Art Show displaying their latest creations.

Art enthusiasts can get a sneak peek at many of the sculptures and paintings that will be on display at the show through a special online show at natureworks.org. Participants can read artist biographies, view a map of booth locations and even purchase art during the regular show hours on March 4-5.

Bradford Williams, a sculptor from Prescott, Arizona is the featured artist at this year’s NatureWorks Wildlife Art Show. Williams produced “Tulsa Trumpeter,” one of the 14 bronze monuments dedicated to the City of Tulsa by NatureWorks and its patrons.

The annual Wildlife Art Show and Sale sponsored by NatureWorks, a non-profit organization, has generated matching grants to assist a variety of organizations for use in state wildlife conservation projects.

Programs such as the Hunters Against Hunger program, the Harold Stuart Waterfowl Refuge Unit within the Deep Fork Wildlife Management Area (WMA) and the Grassy Slough WMA have benefited from NatureWorks generous support.

The NatureWorks Wildlife Art Show and Sale will be held at the Tulsa Marriott-Southern Hills, Saturday, March 4 through Sunday, March 5. For more information about NatureWorks or the art show, call (918) 296-4278 or log on to www.natureworks.org.

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Hunters reminded to tag bobcats

The Oklahoma bobcat season closes Feb. 28, and anyone who has harvested a bobcat must have it tagged by March 14, 2006. All bobcats must be tagged by an authorized Wildlife Department employee or at a designated bobcat tagging station. A list of designated private bobcat tagging stations is available on the Department's Web site. Stations may charge a fee of 75 cents per tag. The tags need to be on the pelt to verify its legal harvest.

Bobcats are common in Oklahoma, and pelts from cats harvested in the state may be sold on the worldwide market. However, bobcats are not as common in other parts of the nation. The CITES (Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species) Act is an international law designed to keep track of where certain types of animals, like bobcats, are harvested.

To obtain a registration form for other pelts contact the Department’s Wildlife Division at (405) 521-2739.

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Commission approves slate of hunting and fishing regulation changes

The Wildlife Conservation Commission approved a slate of hunting and fishing regulations at their February meeting, highlighted by the creation of a youth-only spring turkey season beginning the spring of 2007.

Based on feedback from hunters, however, the Commission did not adopt any of the proposed changes to the deer hunting regulations, nor did they vote to allow recorded turkey calls.

“Many hunters told us they did not like several of these proposals, such as reducing the buck limit or extending muzzleloader season, and that is why we did not recommend their approval to the Commission,” said Alan Peoples, wildlife chief for the Oklahoma Department of Wildlife Conservation. “We had excellent turnouts at our public meetings to discuss these proposals in January. The input and desires of sportsmen and sportswomen play an important role in the rule making process.”

Each year the Oklahoma Department of Wildlife Conservation reviews the hunting and fishing regulations and provides recommendations to the eight-member Wildlife Conservation Commission, which oversees the agency and establishes state hunting and fishing regulations. Regulation changes are designed to increase hunter and angler opportunity, reflect the desires of sportsmen and protect the state’s rich wildlife and fisheries resources.

Following is a highlighted list of measures passed by the Commission. For a complete list, log on to wildlifedepartment.com

  • Remove the prohibition limiting hunters to one tom turkey per day. Change will go into effect spring of 2007.
  • Create a new "youth only" spring turkey season, weekend prior to regular season, one tom limit which counts towards the three tom spring limit. Change will go into effect spring of 2007.
  • Reduce hunter education class hours from ten to eight hours; allow for “test only” certification for hunters needing a certificate for out of state hunts but exempt in Oklahoma.
  • Lower the size limit on walleye at Lake Murray from 18 inches to 14 inches and lower the size limit on walleye and saugeye at Foss Lake from 16 inches to 14 inches. Include Sooner Lake to the list of lakes having a combined limit of 20 striped bass hybrids and/or white bass of which only five may be 20 inches or longer.  Change will go into effect Jan. 1, 2007.
  • Allow limited harvest of red fox, no more than 2, and make the fox limit a combined limit with both gray and red fox included.  Allow an increase in the raccoon harvest from 6 to 10 daily and from 30 to 40 annually. Change will go into effect fall of 2006.
  • Include Texas County (west of Highway 136) to the landowner and controlled antelope hunts and removes landowner permits from once in a lifetime restriction. Change will go into effect fall of 2006.
  • Personnel with the Oklahoma Department of Wildlife Conservation did not recommend the following changes and the Commission voted down the proposals.

  • Allow recorded calls when turkey hunting.
  • Reduce the number of antlered deer that a hunter may harvest annually from three to two.
  • Increase the number of deer that can be harvested by archers from the present four deer to six deer and allow archery hunters to harvest a deer of either sex during the period of January 1 to January 15.
  • Lengthen the muzzleloader season by adding an additional seven days to the beginning of the season.
  • Also at the meeting, Rhonda Hurst, Wildlife Expo coordinator for the Oklahoma Department of Wildlife Conservation, was recognized as the Oklahoma Bowhunting Council Wildlife Professional of the Year.

    More than 45,000 people participated in the first Oklahoma Wildlife Expo last August. The Oklahoma Department of Wildlife Conservation partnered with a wide range of other state agencies, private individuals and outdoor-related companies to host the monumental event, which featured more than 100 hands-on activities. The Expo was designed to promote and perpetuate the appreciation of Oklahoma’s wildlife and natural resources and provide hands-on learning opportunities for all types of outdoor recreation.

    According to initial survey results, more than 80 percent of Expo participants were satisfied or very satisfied with the Expo and said they were likely or very likely to attend the 2006 Oklahoma Wildlife Expo (Aug. 25-27 at the Lazy E Arena just north of Oklahoma City).

    In other business, the Commission recognized four Department employees for their outstanding service to the sportsmen of the state. Employees recognized were:

    • Gary Smeltzer, game warden stationed in Creek County, for 40 years of service;

    • Garland Wright, central region fisheries supervisor, for 35 years of service;

    • Carlton Sallee, game warden stationed in Okfuskee County, for 30 years of service;

    • Bob Mullinax, game warden stationed in Love County, for 30 years of service.

    Commissioners met in executive session and upon returning to open session, the Commission voted to authorize the director to extend an offer to the Oklahoma Department of Tourism and Recreation to settle pending litigation regarding Wildlife Department-owned property in Marshall County. The Commission also voted to approve a settlement agreement regarding pending litigation with an exotic animal facility in Garvin County.

    The Wildlife Conservation Commission is the eight-member governing board of the Oklahoma Department of Wildlife Conservation. The Wildlife Commission establishes state hunting and fishing regulations, sets policy for the Wildlife Department, and indirectly oversees all state fish and wildlife conservation activities. Commission members are appointed by the Governor and confirmed by the Senate.

    The next scheduled Commission meeting is March 6 at the Oklahoma Department of Wildlife Conservation headquarters (auditorium), at the southwest corner of 18th and North Lincoln, Oklahoma City at 9:00 a.m. 

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    Rattlesnake hunting permits now available at rattlesnake festivals

    While most people tend to avoid rattlesnakes whenever possible, there are more than a few who actually go looking for them. These brave individuals gather each spring at rattlesnake round-ups, hunts and festivals in communities like Apache, Mangum, Waurika, Okeene and Waynoka.

    In a cooperative effort, Oklahoma Representative Joe Dorman and the Oklahoma Department of Wildlife Conservation have made it more convenient for participants of these unique events to purchase a $5 rattlesnake hunting permit. These permits will now be available through the event organizer.

    “These community festivals are not only a long standing tradition and important part of our culture, these events are also a big boost to local economies. Visitors come from miles around to participate, have a good time with their families and just to see these unique spectacles,” Dorman said.

    Dorman, the assistant democratic floor leader, represents Oklahomans in District 65 which includes the municipalities of Apache, Cyril, Cement, Elgin, Fletcher, Fort Sill, Lawton, Medicine Park, Ninnekah, Rush Springs and Sterling – an area of the state noted for rattlesnakes and rattlesnake hunts. In addition to his involvement in the Apache Rattlesnake Association, Dorman also is a member of the National Rifle Association, the Farmers Union, the Farm Bureau, and the National Wild Turkey Federation. Dorman also serves as the House Vice Chairman of the Legislative Sportsman’s Caucus.

    “We’re always looking for ways to make it easier for sportsmen to spend time in the outdoors. You can purchase a 5-day rattlesnake hunting permit over the Internet, at the Wildlife Department’s office in Oklahoma City and now you can purchase a permit at the rattlesnake festivals,” said Melinda Sturgess-Streich, chief of administration for the Oklahoma Department of Wildlife Conservation.

    For more information about rattlesnake festivals in Oklahoma, contact:

    Okeene Annual Rattlesnake Hunt - For more information call (580) 822-3101

    Waynoka Snake Hunt, April 22 - For more information call (580) 824-1471

    Waurika Rattlesnake Hunt, April 7-9 - For more information call (580) 228-2553 o

    Mangum Rattlesnake Derby, April 29-30 - For more information call (580) 782-2434

    Apache Rattlesnake Festival – For more information call (580) 588-3361

    Any person hunting during an organized rattlesnake hunting event or festival must have a 5-Day rattlesnake permit, unless exempt. Persons with a valid hunting or combination hunting/fishing license are exempt from the rattlesnake permit. Individuals hunting rattlesnakes at a rattlesnake event or festival are exempt from the Fishing and Hunting Legacy Permit.

     

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    Oklahoma kids from Tecumseh and Choctaw to compete in Junior Bassmaster World Championship

    A pair of angler protégés will represent Oklahoma in the 2006 Junior Bassmaster World Championship to be held on the Harris Chain of Lakes in Leesburg, Florida, Feb.19.

    Colt McMahan, of Tecumseh, and Jonathon Jones, of Choctaw earned the right to compete in the annual event by winning the state Junior Bassmaster Championship held at Lake Konawa last July. McMahan will compete in the 15-18 year old category and Jones will compete in the 11-14 year old category.

    The championship kicks off when anglers from the two different age groups are randomly paired together during a banquet that celebrates each participant who qualified. Each couple is then paired with a CITGO Bassmaster Classic angler who serves as a mentor and boat driver.

    “I’m really looking forward to this opportunity. I think it will be a lot of fun to fish with a professional angler and maybe pick up a few tips too,” McMahan said.

    BASS pays the expense of the meals and lodging for all participants and the event winners receive about $27,000 in scholarships and the prestige that comes along with the title of Junior Bassmaster World Champion.

    “Winning would be really cool, but I’m not too worried about that right now. I just think it will be a lot of fun to experience a tournament like this in Florida,” said Jonathon Jones, a sixth grader in Choctaw.

    The Junior Bassmaster program, which started in 1983, continues to be an excellent investment in the future of fishing, according to Don Rucks, BASS vice president and general manager.

    “Serving the youth anglers is a huge priority for BASS,” Rucks said. “I can’t wait for the day when an angler who competed in our Junior World Championship becomes a Bassmaster Classic champion.”

    Junior Bassmaster Chapters and tournaments are a part of the adult BASS Federation Program. Members, who become sponsors for Junior Bassmaster Chapters, act as mentors who foster and pass on the traditions associated with the sport of fishing and thrills of the outdoors.

    The Junior Bassmaster World Championship are part of the CITGO Bassmaster Classic week, which culminates with the Classic tournament, Feb. 24-26 on Lake Tohopekaliga in Kissimmee, Fla.

    For more information about the BASS organization log on to http://sports.espn.go.com/outdoors/bassmaster/

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    Caption: Colt McMahan, of Tecumseh, shown here with an eight-pound largemouth he caught at Konawa Lake last year, will represent Oklahoma in the 2006 Jr. Bassmasters World Championship, Feb. 19 in Leesburg, Florida.

     

    Okmulgee fur auction shows strong prices; Perry auction canceled

    Fur harvesters went home happy from the January 28 fur auction held in Okmulgee.

    Nearly 100 bobcat pelts were sold for an average of about $50, including a high price of $140. A total of 435 raccoon pelts were sold and averaged $5 each. Beaver furs averaged $9.24 at the sale hosted by the First Oklahoma Trappers and Predators Association.

    “We had a good sale in Okmulgee, however with unseasonably warm, dry weather and high gas prices we’ve unfortunately had to cancel the fur auction in Perry originally scheduled for Feb. 11. However, there has already been quite a bit of interest from both buyers and sellers for our next auction in Okmulgee and I am expecting a good turnout,” said Bill Jackson with the First Oklahoma Trappers and Predator Callers Association.

    The fur auction will be held Saturday, March 4 at the Okmulgee Fairgrounds in Okmulgee. Both events will begin 9 a.m.

    To participate in the auction, sellers must have a current Oklahoma trapping and hunting license. Sellers must also be members of the First Oklahoma Trappers and Predator Callers Assoc. Furs may be stretched and dried or "green." All bobcat pelts must be affixed with an export tag before they can be sold or shipped. Personnel from the Oklahoma Department of Wildlife Conservation will be present to provide tags, if necessary. Individuals selling furs should consult the "2005-06 Oklahoma Hunting Guide" regarding possessing pelts after the close of the furbearer season.

    In addition, sellers who bring furs that belong to another person must possess that person's hunting and trapping license, as well as a letter signed by that person authorizing them to sell his or her fur.

    Likewise, fur buyers are required to possess an Oklahoma fur buyer's permit in order to purchase unprocessed fur. For more information, contact Bill Jackson at (918) 336-8154.

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     Tickets available for Oklahoma Station of the Safari Club International's annual banquet

                The Oklahoma Station of the Safari Club International will hold their annual banquet Saturday, March 4, at the National Cowboy and Western Heritage Museum in Oklahoma City. The event offers outdoor enthusiasts a great chance to take part in many important projects and programs supported by the Oklahoma Station of the Safari Club.

                Most recently the Oklahoma Station of the Safari Club International was a sponsor of the first annual Oklahoma Wildlife Expo. Last year the organization also donated $3,000 to the Hunter's Against Hunger program, which facilitates the distribution of hunter-harvested venison to needy families.

                The organization also donated $3,000 to be used towards the purchase of an airboat that will be used on waterfowl surveys and other wetland management tasks. Recently, the group provided a 24-foot gooseneck trailer to the Department. The trailer is now used in the Department's Shotgun Training Education Program, which introduces both youth and adults to shotgun shooting techniques and the proper handling of firearms. Additionally, the organization purchased eight elk for introduction into an existing herd in southeast Oklahoma.

                The Oklahoma Station of the Safari Club International also sponsors the Department's annual youth essay contest. The contest gives youngsters the opportunity to share their feelings about the Oklahoma outdoors and gives them the opportunity to win great prizes including a guided pronghorn antelope hunt in New Mexico.

                In addition to a great meal and fine fellowship one of the highlights of the annual event is the live auction. Bidders will have a chance buy guided hunts in Oklahoma, across the United States and around the world. There will also be a wide array of items on the auction block including art, firearms, camping equipment, vacations, jewelry and much more.

     For more information or to purchase tickets call (405) 721-7229. 

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    NatureWorks to hold annual art show

                Oklahomans will soon have an opportunity to view the works of some of the country's most talented wildlife artists at the NatureWorks Wildlife Art Show and Sale, March 4-5. The annual show, held in Tulsa, attracts some of the best wildlife sculptors and painters in the nation.

                Highlighting this year’s show will be more than 20 original Federal Duck Stamp paintings on display, including Sherrie Russell Meline's painting of Ross' geese which will be featured on the 2006 federal duck stamp. Bruce Miller, Mark Anderson, and Scott Storm, each past duck stamp winners, will be at the Wildlife Art Show displaying their latest creations.

                Art enthusiasts can get a sneak peek at many of the sculptures and paintings that will be on display at the show through a special online show at natureworks.org. Participants can read artist biographies, view a map of booth locations and even purchase art during the regular show hours on March 4-5.

                Bradford Williams, a sculptor from Prescott, Arizona is the featured artist at this year’s NatureWorks Wildlife Art Show. Williams produced “Tulsa Trumpeter,” one of the 14 bronze monuments dedicated to the City of Tulsa by NatureWorks and its patrons.

                The annual Wildlife Art Show and Sale sponsored by NatureWorks, a non-profit organization, has generated matching grants to assist a variety of organizations for use in state wildlife conservation projects.

                Programs such as the Hunters Against Hunger program, the Harold Stuart Waterfowl Refuge Unit within the Deep Fork Wildlife Management Area (WMA) and the Grassy Slough WMA have benefited from NatureWorks generous support.

                The NatureWorks Wildlife Art Show and Sale will be held at the Tulsa Marriott-Southern Hills, Saturday, March 4 through Sunday, March 5. For more information about NatureWorks or the art show, call (918) 296-4278 or log on to www.natureworks.org.

     

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    Snow goose hunters reminded to register

                Waterfowl hunters who aren’t quite ready to hang up their goose hunting gear for the year have the perfect chance to extend their season and help the arctic ecosystem at the same time. The Conservation Order Light Goose Season (COLGS), which is currently open and runs through March 31, is designed to reduce the mid-continent light geese population.

                Light geese, which include snow, blue and Ross’ geese, have become so numerous that they are causing severe habitat destruction to their Arctic breeding grounds. Since 1999, the Oklahoma Department of Wildlife Conservation has cooperated with the United States Fish and Wildlife Service to establish the COLGS.

                Due to land-use practices in the south-central U.S. which are beneficial to light geese, adult survival rates have increased significantly. The overpopulation of light geese continues to degrade Arctic habitat. Because snow geese feed by grubbing and pulling out plants by the roots, large numbers can literally destroy extensive areas of the tundra.

                Federal law requires that the Oklahoma Department of Wildlife Conservation estimate the harvest of light geese during the Conservation Order Light Goose Season. Hunters who plan to pursue snow, blue and Ross' geese during the Conservation Order are asked to register with the Department and provide their name, address and telephone number so a harvest survey can be administered when the COLGS ends.

                Hunters can register for the season by going to the Department's Web site: www.wildlifedepartment.com

                Or, they can mail a letter or postcard to: Oklahoma Department of Wildlife Conservation; Attn: COLGS; P.O. Box 53465; Oklahoma City, OK 73152.

                The COLGS provides for certain special methods of take, including one-half hour after sunset shooting hours, no bag limits, electronic calls and unplugged shotguns. Even with the special regulations, the birds can be very challenging to harvest in Oklahoma.

                For more information and regulations on the COLGS, hunters should consult the “2005-2006 Oklahoma Waterfowl Hunting Guide,” available at license dealers across the state, or by logging on to the Department’s Web site at www.wildlifedepartment.com.

     

     

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    Department accepting applications for youth wildlife camp

                Kids who love the outdoors will want to turn in their application to attend the Oklahoma Department of Wildlife Conservation's Wildlife Youth Camp. Youth interested in wildlife, fisheries and law enforcement can have fun and learn a thing or two at the weeklong camp, which is conducted each year by wildlife professionals including game wardens and biologists.

                “It is one of my favorite events of the year. The camp is a great opportunity for kids to learn what wildlife professionals do on a day to day to basis. And the thing parents will like the most – it’s absolutely free,” said Jon Cunningham, camp coordinator and Oklahoma game warden stationed in Payne County.

                Scheduled June 11-16 at Camp McFadden near Ponca City, the camp is open to Oklahoma youths ages 14 to 16. Applicants must turn 14 prior to June 11, 2006. Participants will attend courses in firearms handling, wildlife law enforcement, wildlife and fisheries biology, water safety, self-defense, rifle and shotgun training, waterfowl hunting and archery.

                The camp is free of charge, but will be limited to 35 participants. Applicants should be interested in fish and wildlife management or law enforcement and must submit a 75-word essay explaining why they want to attend the camp, why they believe they should be selected and what they expect to learn while attending. They must also submit a letter of recommendation from a person of their choice other than a family member.

                The application deadline is April 28. To obtain applications, contact the Wildlife Department's Law Enforcement Division at P.O. Box 53465, Oklahoma City, OK 73152, or call (405) 521-3719. Applications may also be available from local wardens or from the Wildlife Department's Web site at www.wildlifedepartment.com. Simply print off the application, fill it out and mail it in with the essay and letter of recommendation.

     

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    Wildlife employment exam scheduled
                 If your career aspirations include such titles as game warden, wildlife and fisheries biologist or technician, or fish hatchery manager, you will want to make sure you take the Oklahoma Department of Wildlife Conservation (ODWC) employment exam. The exam is the first step of the hiring process for anyone seeking the positions listed above.
                 On Friday, March 31, the ODWC is offering its standardized employment exam at 10:00 a.m. at the Tom Steed Development Center Auditorium located on the Rose State College campus. The Center is located immediately north off of I-40 on Hudiburg Road in Midwest City. The exam will also be given at 10:00 a.m. Saturday, April 1 on the Oklahoma State University campus in Stillwater in the Life Sciences West building, Room 103. The exam is free and participants must have photo identification upon check-in. Late arrivals will not be permitted to enter the examination room after 10:00 a.m. Participants may take the exam at either, but not both locations.
                "Two different exams will be given," said Kyle Eastham, human resource administrator for the Department. "One exam is for biologist, game warden and assistant hatchery manager level positions. These positions require a Bachelor's degree. The other exam is for technician level positions, which typically require either two years of college coursework in wildlife or a related field, or four to six years of similar job experience."
                 Specific job and education requirements for ODWC positions as well as suggested study material for the exams are listed on the Department's official Web site www.wildlifedepartment.com. In addition, the Wildlife Department’s Requirements and Selection Procedures brochure can be picked up at either Department headquarters in Oklahoma City, or the Tulsa-area office located at the Oklahoma Aquarium in Jenks.
                 Eastham added, “We’ve had some retirements and promotions recently, so this may be a good year to take the employment test, since I’m sure we’ll be filling some vacancies.”
                Individuals may take the exam once in a 12-month period. Test scores are valid for 12 months from the test date. Top scorers will be invited to submit an employment application. When a job opening becomes available, selected applicants from the test register will be scheduled for an interview. For more information, contact the Department of Wildlife’s Human Resources office at (405) 521-4640.

     

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     Got a great picture? Send it to “Outdoor Oklahoma” magazine

                Photographers have just a few more weeks to submit their work to “Outdoor Oklahoma” magazine’s annual Readers' Photography Showcase. Readers have until March 24 to submit their best shot.

                "One of the great things about the annual Readers' Photography Showcase is the great variety of images we receive, from a scenic sunset, to a close-up of an insect, to a flock of turkeys - but we especially enjoy those images of hunters and anglers in the field," said Nels Rodefeld, “Outdoor Oklahoma” editor.

                The special issue offers a great chance for photographers, either professional or amateur, to display their color slides, prints or digital photos in a magazine that consistently receives national recognition for its photographic excellence. Hopeful photographers have until March 24 to submit their best shots.

                According to Rodefeld, the magazine has been featuring a growing number of digital images over the past few years.

                “We have received many outstanding digital images the past two or three years, in fact the cover of last year’s Readers’ Photo Showcase was a digital submission. Unfortunately, many digital photos that we receive will not print well due to their small image size,” Rodefeld said.

                A good rule of thumb is that an image should be at least 300 dpi (dots per inch) and the canvas size should be about 8 inches by 11 inches.

                The photographer's name, address and phone number need to be printed on each slide using a fine point pen or rubber stamp. Slides should not be encased in glass.

                Each participant may submit up to five images and all entries will be returned undamaged. Each submission should include a description of the photo including location taken, camera used, names of subjects and what it took to get just the right shot.

                Photographers can mail their submission to Paul Moore, Photo Editor, “Outdoor Oklahoma,” Oklahoma Dept. of Wildlife Conservation, P.O. Box 53465, Oklahoma City, OK 73152. T

                Individuals can subscribe to “Outdoor Oklahoma,” on the universal license form wherever hunting and fishing licenses are sold; or they can do “bill me” by calling 1-800-777-0019. Subscriptions are just $10 for one year, $18 for two years, or $25 for three years. You can also subscribe over the Internet by logging on to the Department's Web site at www.wildlifedepartment.com.

     

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    Landscaping book offers details on attracting wildlife

                 Whether you have an expansive acreage in the country or a tiny backyard in the city, you can invite wildlife to your property.

                The guidebook “Landscaping for Wildlife: A Guide to the Southern Great Plains” was produced by the Oklahoma Department of Wildlife Conservation and shows homeowners how to create backyard habitats to attract birds, butterflies and other native wildlife.

                 The easy-to-read, 224-pages cover designing water features and butterfly gardens to building birdhouses and toad holes. Beginners and experts will like the book’s detailed, but easy-to-follow instructions and diagrams according to Jenny Thom, natural resources information specialist for the Oklahoma Department of Wildlife.

                “You’ll find simple and inexpensive ideas in this book,” Thom said. “And you’ll also find the steps to transform your entire yard into a wildlife oasis.”

                “Landscaping for Wildlife” is the only landscaping book on the market covering this region. It places specific emphasis on Oklahoma species and lists wildlife-friendly plants adapted to grow here. 

                It’s arranged to allow the reader to target chosen wildlife species. Bird charts detail the time of year different birds are here, their preferred foods and habitat needs. Plant listings identify specific plants and native grasses necessary to invite the selected wildlife.

                “Your yard doesn’t have to look wild just because you’re landscaping with the needs of wildlife in mind,” Thom said.

                Many landowners are pleasantly surprised to learn they can still end up with a well-manicured yard, and mid-March is a great time to begin planting, Thom explained.

                 “If you plant this spring, you’ll receive the benefits this summer. Your yard will require less watering and general upkeep, and as an added bonus, it will be ornamented by birds and butterflies,” Thom said. 

                Look for “Landscaping for Wildlife: A guide to the Southern Plains” by Jeremy Garrett at local bookstores. It retails for $28.95, but may also be purchased from the Wildlife Department for $20.00 plus $4 shipping and handling.

                For your copy, drop by the Wildlife Department headquarters at 1801 N. Lincoln Blvd., or send a check or money order to: ODWC, Landscaping Book, PO Box 53465, Oklahoma City, OK 73152.

                For more information visit www.wildlifedepartment.com or contact the Wildlife Diversity Program at (405) 521-4616.

     

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