Frequently Asked Questions

Feral Hogs

Hog populations are variable and it is hard to determine the best public land on which to hunt hogs. Contact other hunters and area managers of public land for more information.

When there is a deer and/or turkey season open on the WMA, only appropriate methods, hunting hours, and weapons for that deer and/or turkey season are authorized for taking or pursuing feral hogs. Also, during the firearms deer seasons (muzzleloader, modern gun and special antlerless seasons) you must possess a filled or unfilled deer license for that appropriate season, and you must comply with other regulations that apply to that season (blaze orange requirements, for example).

No, you cannot hunt hogs on a WMA if you have a suspended or revoked license.  

When there is a deer and/or turkey season open, hogs may not be taken or pursued with dogs on WMAs. Outside of deer and/or turkey seasons, you may utilize dogs to hunt hogs when there are other open seasons that allow for the use of dogs as a means of hunting.   

Yes, but only outside of any open deer or turkey seasons. You can not shoot pigs at night on any public lands.

No, under no circumstances (including while hunting furbearers).

Yes, but you can not use bait.

Consult the Oklahoma Hunting Guide for most areas. However during any open deer and/or turkey season, only appropriate methods, hunting hours and legal equipment for that deer and/or turkey season are authorized for taking or pursuing feral hogs.

For instance you can not shoot at a pig:

  • with a .22 rifle if you are rabbit hunting on Oct. 15
  • with a shotgun if you are duck or quail hunting on Dec. 10
  • with a concealed carry gun while check traps or setting up tree stand on  or waterfowl hunting from Oct. 1-Jan 15 (deer archery season).
  • With a rifle while predator calling on Jan. 10

A hunting license is required for hunting hogs on public land, unless exempt.

Additionally, if you are hunting during one of the following seasons with a shotgun and rifled slug, or any rifle or handgun larger than .22 caliber rimfire, you must possess a filled or unfilled license appropriate for the current season, unless otherwise exempt.

  • youth deer gun
  • bear muzzleloader (in open counties),
  • deer muzzleloader,
  • deer gun,
  • Holiday Antlerless Deer Gun (in open zones),
  • elk gun (in open counties)
  • antelope gun (in open areas)

The Department does not license guides and therefore does not maintain a list of guide services. You may be able to find a hog hunting guide by looking in the newspaper, on the Internet or at one of the state’s outdoor/hunting shows. 

The fines will be similar to those for other game law violations. 

Yes, you will need to obtain landowner permission to retrieve the animal.

Hunter safety certification is not required specifically for hunting hogs. However, if you are hunting on public land or if you are hunting on private land during any firearms big game season, a hunting license and/or appropriate big game license is required, and these licenses may require proof of hunter safety certification to purchase.

Hogs, like all mammals, can get rabies but it is very uncommon.

Commercial hunt areas are licensed by the Oklahoma Department of Wildlife Conservation. These areas can not sell hog hunts, but hunters may shoot hogs if they are encountered on the area if allowed by the commercial hunt area. Hogs may be shot year round in commercial hunt areas.

Same as on private lands. Additionally, hunters must have a $25 license from ODAFF. You can get that license here: http://kellysolutions.com/ok/swinehunter/newapplication/applynow.asp

There are two options:

  • Hunt on private land
  • Hunt at a sporting facilities licensed by the Oklahoma Department of Agriculture, Food and Forestry.

Cimarron, Texas, Beaver, Harper, Woods, Ellis, Woodward, Garfield, Grant, Alfalfa counties make up the  feral swine free zone.
Transportation of live feral swine into, through, or within a feral swine free zone is prohibited.
Feral swine facilities are prohibited within the zone and licenses for existing feral swine facilities in the zone will not be renewed.
People can hunt or trap hogs in the zone and are required report any feral swine activity to the ODAFF, to include but not limited to any observation, capture, or kill.

This is law established by the Oklahoma State Legislature as it relates wild pigs you can see the full law here: http://www.oda.state.ok.us/ais/rules-feralswine.pdf

Exemptions are available through an app, online or through the game warden in your county or adjoining.

To get the app through the app store on your Apple or Android by searching for Oklahoma Hog (the official name is OK Feral Hog Night Shooting Exemption App).

Exemptions are available online at wildlifedepartment.com

Fill out your basic information a copy of the exemption will be emailed to you or you can print one off.

If you choose not to use the app or the website you can call, text, or visit in person with your county game warden or adjoining county who will provide you an exemption.

Persons shooting hogs at night on a night shooting exemption may not shoot from, to, on, or across any public roadway.

The following is legal when night shooting with this exemption:

  • Night vision
  • Thermal imaging
  • Infrared technology (night scopes)
  • Spot light including those mounted on firearms
  • Vehicle headlights or vehicle mounted lights (not on public roads)
  • Pursuit with vehicle such as an ATV (not on public roads)

Outside of the 16-day deer gun season:

  • Everyone night shooting pigs must carry written permission from the landowner or landowner designee.
  • At least one person in the group must have a copy of the exemption (from either the landowner or his/her designee).
  • Encouraged, but not required, to provide notification of night shooting activity to local game warden.


During the 16-day deer gun season:

  • Only the landowner or the landowner designee (who has obtained the exemption) may night shoot.
  • Family members (parents, kids, grandkids, sons/daughters-inlaws) of the landowner or the landowner designee can assist, including shooting.
  • At least one person in the group must have a copy of the exemption (from either the landowner or his/her designee).
  • The exemption holder (landowner or landowner designee) must be present.
  • Some type of advance notification to the local game warden is required.
  • If you are not the landowner, the landowner designee or family member (see above) you can not night shoot.

Landowner Exemption – held by the deed holding landowner

Landowner Designee – The deed holding landowner can designate one person annually to hold his/her exemption.

Hog hunter – a hunter who does not own land or who has not been named the landowner’s designee can hunt at night shoot pigs “under” the exemption of the landowner or his/her designee.  With a copy of the exemption and written landowner permission on their person.

Only on private land and you must have an immediate exemption obtained through web site, app or through a game warden. Plus you must possess written landowner permission.

Yes, year-round. However, you can not kill them with a firearm unless you have obtained an night shooting exemption and written landowner permission.

Under the Feral Swine Control Act, The Oklahoma Department of Agriculture, Food, and Forestry (ODAFF) administers the licensing program for feral swine transporters and handling/hunting facilities.

If for any reason a person handles live feral swine, it is strongly recommended that he or she become familiar with the Feral Swine Control Act and administrative rules. These regulations, applications, management guides, lists of licensed handling/hunting facilities, and more can all be found on the ODAFF Feral Swine web page, www.ag.ok.gov/ais/feralswine. For more information, contact Dr. Justin Roach of ODAFF at (405) 522-6124 or e-mail justin.roach@ag.ok.gov.

The Oklahoma Feral Swine Control Association is comprised of hunters, trappers, hunting ranches, farmers and ranchers united in the common goal of eradicating feral swine from the State of Oklahoma. You can find more info about the group at  https://www.facebook.com/OklahomaFeralSwineControlAssociation

Call USDA Wildlife Services (405) 521-4039 (also see OFSCA)

Contact your local meat processor to see if they are licensed to process wild hogs. Many hog hunters process their own meat, so your best bet for “do it yourself” tips may be to visit with other hunters who have processed their own animals.

No, there are no tags or check stations for feral hogs.

No, there are no limits for feral hogs.

No licenses required for trapping pigs on private lands and no rules relating to trap size, posting, etc…

You can use any type of weapon you want to use on private land.

Yes, any time but only on private land.

Same license requirements as for residents as it relates to hogs (both private and public land).

No. Unless it is a Judas Pig. This is a population control technique in which a feral swine is caught, radio-collared and released at the trap site, then tracked down after it joins other feral swine so that those swine can be removed. The feral hog must be released onto the same private land on which it was caught within 24 hours of its capture. For more details, go online to www.ag.ok.gov/ais/feralswine.

Landowners may obtain a free hog control permit from the local game warden allowing them to harvest hogs during antelope, bear, deer and elk firearm seasons without purchasing the corresponding big-game license (night shooting exemptions are also available, see below). Landowners must always call the Game Warden to obtain the permit.

You must wear a head covering or upper garment while hunting pigs during the day on public and private lands during any open big game season.

No hunting license needed for private land, but a hunting license is required for public land.

A filled or unfilled license (deer, elk, antelope, bear) is not required when you are not hunting with a shotgun and rifled slug, or any rifle or handgun larger than .22 caliber rimfire. You can not use dogs or a knife during any open big game seasons.

No hunting license is required.

However, if you are hunting during one of the following seasons with a shotgun and rifled slug, or any rifle or handgun larger than .22 caliber rimfire, you must possess a filled or unfilled license appropriate for the current season, unless otherwise exempt.

  • youth deer gun
  • bear muzzleloader (in open counties),
  • deer muzzleloader,
  • deer gun,
  • Holiday Antlerless Deer Gun (in open zones),
  • elk gun (in open counties)
  • antelope gun (in open areas)

Hunter Education

You must complete a hunter education course to become an instructor. After that complete and return a volunteer application. Before becoming an instructor, you will have to attend a hunter education instructor workshop, pass an interview with the local game warden or program coordinator, teach a one hour segment of hunter education under the supervision of a certified instructor or game warden and pass a background check. For more information contact Lance Meek, Hunter Education Coordinator, at (405)522-4572.

All classroom materials are provided for you by the hunter education instructor. Be aware that most classes last 8 hours, the instructor will provide adequate breaks.  Be sure to preregister for your course if necessary. If your class is a home study course, bring along the home study portion (either the printed certificate or your completed workbook). DO NOT bring any firearms or ammunition to class.

Anyone can complete the online course, however you must be 10 YEARS OF AGE OR OLDER to receive hunter education certification from the course. Make sure when you register for the class online that you enter the correct date of birth.

Call (866)521-2444 or email helpdesk@omes.ok.gov from 6 a.m. to midnight Monday through Friday.

Students under the age of ten may attend a hunter education class, but will not be allowed to take the test or get a card.

You will only be able to access your card if you have the exact information in our database. First try any other name the card could possibly be under. For example, if your name is “Michael” but you go by “Mike” try both names. If you still can’t find it, call (405)521-3855. The more information you have, the better. We can use any of the following information to help you find your card: name, date of birth, social security number, location of your course, course instructor or the year of your course. We do not have access to card information from other states.

You can replace your Oklahoma hunter education card by printing it off of at www.wildlifedepartment.com/huntereducationx/default. Simply type your name and date of birth exactly as it would appear on the original card. If you would like a hard plastic replacement card fill out this form and send a copy along with $5.00 to PO Box 53465, Oklahoma City, OK 73152. If you have any issues call (405)521-3855.

Hunting

To make arrangement to have your deer scored contact Wildlife Division at (405) 521-2730.

For more information about the Cy Curtis Awards Program